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Imagery and Verbal Memory

  • Marc Marschark
  • Cesare Cornoldi

Abstract

Since Paivio’s (1971) treatise on imagery and verbal processes, a variety of authors have provided reviews of data and theories concerning imagery and memory for verbal materials. In this way, a long-standing area of investigation has come to be considered in a more systematic and critical manner. The tradition of linking imagery and memory, however, goes back at least to Aristotle, who, in his treatise on memory (I, 450a, 20–25) asserted:

Τíνος μŧν οΰν τών τñς ψνχñς έστιν ή μνήυη, φανερòν, δτι οŧπερ χαì ή φαντασία, χαι ϊστι μνημονευτà α αθ’ αύτà uìν δσz έστì φανταστà, χατà συuбτбηχòς ö δσє

“It is therefore clear in which part of the soul memory is, that is, in the same part where also imagination is. In fact, memory objects are per se those which fall into imagination incidentally, those which are not separated from imagination.”

Keywords

Lexical Decision Free Recall Mental Imagery Abstract Word Dual Code 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marc Marschark
  • Cesare Cornoldi

There are no affiliations available

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