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Imagery and Thinking

  • Michel Denis

Abstract

One of the thorniest but perhaps most critical issues in the field of imagery is providing a cogent account of its relationships to thinking. Significant advances in this area have been made over the last ten years (e.g., Kaufmann, 1980, 1984; Kosslyn, 1983; Paivio, 1986; Richardson, 1983). What makes this enterprise so difficult is that the concept of imagery and, more crucially, the concept of thinking have been defined in a variety of ways. The prerequisite for identifying the relationships between the two concepts is obviously clarification of the concepts themselves.

Keywords

Visual Image Mental Imagery Comparative Judgment Representational System Spatial Description 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1991

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  • Michel Denis

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