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Visuo-Spatial Short-Term Memory: Visual Working Memory or Visual Buffer?

  • Robert H. Logie

Abstract

Close your eyes for a moment and attempt to describe from memory, the scene in front of you. If the scene is one with which you are highly familiar, you may find the task straightforward. What you cannot remember of your experience a few seconds ago can be inferred from your extensive experience with the same scene. However, what if the scene is unfamiliar or has new features incorporated, for example if you have to navigate your way across a darkened room after someone has turned out the light? Many people would report experiencing a visual image of the scene, along with a process of ‘scanning’ their image, much as one might scan a real visual scene.

Keywords

Visual Memory Mental Imagery Visual Imagery Articulatory Suppression Irrelevant Speech 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1991

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  • Robert H. Logie

There are no affiliations available

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