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Symmetries and Asymmetries Between Imagery and Perception

  • Margaret J. Intons-Peterson
  • Mark A. McDaniel

Abstract

It is safe to say that, for most of us, our introspective experience is that mental imagery seems to closely mirror perception. Perhaps as a result, much of the work on imagery in the past decade has attempted to (1) explore how closely imagery and perception overlap or parallel each other and (2) develop some theoretical frameworks to explain the parallels.

Keywords

Experimental Psychology Tacit Knowledge Mental Rotation Mental Image Mental Imagery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margaret J. Intons-Peterson
  • Mark A. McDaniel

There are no affiliations available

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