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Application of Mesocosms for Solving Problems in Pollution Research

  • Michael E. Q. Pilson
Part of the Coastal and Estuarine Studies book series (COASTAL, volume 37)

Abstract

Much of the research with marine mesocosms appears to have been driven by a need to investigate the fates and effects of pollutants, with the consequence that basic underlying information on the principles that govern the functioning of these experimental systems and of the natural systems of which they are living models has been given inadequate attention. Nevertheless, research with mesocosms of several types has demonstrated that this approach has great potential to help unravel the processes that affect both the fates of pollutants and their effects on complex ecosystems. Some kinds of information would have been very difficult or impossible to obtain without experimental research in these complex living models. In addition, this research has provided a great deal of basic ecological information about marine ecosystems.

Keywords

Volatile Organic Compound Mesocosm Experiment Coastal Seawater Experimental Ecosystem Pollutant Substance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael E. Q. Pilson

There are no affiliations available

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