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Different Types of Ecosystem Experiments

  • Li Guanguo
Part of the Coastal and Estuarine Studies book series (COASTAL, volume 37)

Abstract

This paper is not intended as a comprehensive classification of the various types of ecosystem experiments in existence or of those suggested by some scientists. The different systems have been reviewed in papers by Kinne (1976), Menzel and Steele (1978), Pilson and Nixon (1980), Giddings (1981), Grice and Reeve (1982a), and in relevant chapters in a book edited by White (1984). In this paper, I will examine some of the problems and concepts in this broad field of work. Controversy is expected, but I hope that the ensuing discussion will be of value to the fulfillment of the Working Group tasks as they were defined by the terms of reference.

Keywords

Trophic Level Fecal Pellet Ecosystem Study Pelagic Ecosystem Enclosure Experiment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1990

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  • Li Guanguo

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