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Combinatorial Aspects of Enzyme Kinetics

  • Peter H. Sellers
Part of the The IMA Volumes in Mathematics and Its Applications book series (IMA, volume 17)

Abstract

Two concepts from chemistry, definable in mathematical terms, are the starting point of this paper: A reaction network (which is a generalization of a graph) and a mechanism for a reaction (which is a generalization of a path from one vertex to another in a graph). Then, as the main result, a statement made in 1964 by P.C. Milner [4] is put into precise terms and proved. To paraphrase Milner’s statement, a mechanism for a reaction r in a given network reduces to the superposition of two or more consistently oriented direct mechanisms for r from the same network, where direct mechanisms are capable of no such reduction. This result is the principal justification of an algorithm, described in this paper, for generating a list of all possible direct mechanisms for a given reaction in a given network. Examples are used to show how these ideas apply to enzyme kinetics studies.

Keywords

Homology Group Chemical System Reaction Network Elementary Reaction Free Abelian Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter H. Sellers
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MathematicsThe Rockefeller UniversityUSA

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