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Meaningless Statements, Matching Experiments, and Colored Digraphs

(Applications of Graph Theory and Combinatorics to the Theory of Measurement)
  • Fred S. Roberts
Conference paper
Part of the The IMA Volumes in Mathematics and Its Applications book series (IMA, volume 17)

Abstract

This paper considers applications of graph theory and combinatorics to the theory of measurement, an interdisciplinary subject developed with the goal of putting the process of measurement on a firm mathematical foundation. Many of the mathematical problems arising from measurement theory are interesting problems in graph theory and combinatorics. After presenting a brief introduction to measurement theory, this paper discusses three questions in measurement theory and the resulting mathematical problems. These problems deal with classifying automorphisms of colored digraphs, specifying certain invariant semiorders and indifference graphs, and identifying certain homogeneous order relations.

Keywords

Binary Relation Measurement Theory Relational System Scale Type Interval Graph 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fred S. Roberts
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MathematicsRutgers UniversityNew BrunswickUSA

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