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Improvement of the Acquisition of Knowledge by Informing Feedback

  • Peter Michael Fischer
  • Heinz Mandl
Part of the Cognitive Science book series (COGNITIVE SCIEN)

Abstract

There is practically no recognized learning theory that neglects the role of feedback for acquisition of skill and knowledge. Any kind of human or animal learning depends on the shaping of behavior, especially the selection of appropriate behaviors necessary for any skilled, goal-directed behavior. The consequences and effects of an action determine whether a sequence of actions or operations becomes integrated into the evolving skill, the skill endowment or repertoire of the organism. Operations most likely to achieve this goal must be adopted and routinized by any organism in order to ensure survival. Feedback about the success (instrumentality) of a behavior or cognitive operation is information about the calibration and refinement necessary for the regulation of actions. “Learning by success” is synonymous for all learning that is regulated by its own outcome.

Keywords

Score Point Ability Group Versus Information High Prior Knowledge Feedback Questionnaire 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Michael Fischer
  • Heinz Mandl

There are no affiliations available

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