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Enhancing Incremental Learning Processes With Knowledge-Based Systems

  • Gerhard Fischer
Part of the Cognitive Science book series (COGNITIVE SCIEN)

Abstract

In the past computer systems limited the user to modes of communication that made the machine’s job easier. But now, as computer cycles become plentiful, our focus can shift to the users and how to make it easier, more productive, and less frustrating for them to cope with complex systems. Empirical investigations show that on the average only a small fraction of the functionality of complex systems is used. Figure 7.1 summarizes data based on careful observations of persons using systems like UNIX, EMACS, SCRIBE, LISP, and so on in our environment. It also describes different levels of system usage that typically can be found within many complex systems. The different domains correspond to the following:
  1. D1

    the subset of concepts (and their associated commands) that the users know and use without any problems.

     
  2. D2

    the subset of concepts that they use only occasionally. Users do not know details about them, and they are not too sure about their effects. Descriptions of commands (e.g., in the form of property sheets), explanations, illustrations (see the section on visualization techniques in prototypical system components) and safeguards (e.g., UNDOs) are important so that the user can gradually master this domain.

     

Keywords

User Model Transformation Rule Instructional Strategy Visualization Technique LISP Programmer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1988

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  • Gerhard Fischer

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