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Human Values, Valences, Expectations and Affect: Theoretical Issues Emerging from Recent Applications of the Expectancy-Value Model

  • N. T. Feather
Part of the Recent Research in Psychology book series (PSYCHOLOGY)

Abstract

More than 25 years have passed since I first came to the University of Michigan to work with Jack Atkinson and to develop ideas about the analysis of persistence in achievement situations (Feather, 1961, 1962). My memories of those early years are very positive ones. To a young Australian on study leave from a small, recently established University in the New England region of New South Wales, the shift to Michigan in the late 1950s was a major turning point. Though at Michigan for only a short time as a graduate student, I formed friendships that have stayed with me throughout my life. The lively and stimulating academic environment provided intellectual experiences that helped to shape my ideas, even though my interest in expectancy-value models was already well-established before I arrived but ready to be more finely tuned. It has been a source of satisfaction to me that the analysis of persistence developed in those graduate years turned out to be a watershed, triggering the development of a new conceptual approach to motivation, the dynamics of action (Atkinson & Birch, 1970).

Keywords

Negative Affect Causal Attribution Attributional Style Affective Reaction Achievement Motivation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. T. Feather
    • 1
  1. 1.The Flinders University of South AustraliaAustralia

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