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The Role of Panel Studies in a World of Scarce Research Resources

  • Greg J. Duncan
  • F. Thomas Juster
  • James N. Morgan
Part of the Lecture Notes in Statistics book series (LNS, volume 38)

Abstract

A major development in social science research in the 1970s was the collection and analysis of several large-scale, nationally representative, longitudinal studies. Much has been learned from these studies because they provide more reliable information on changes in the objective and much more detailed point-in-time information than most existing cross-sectional studies and for much larger samples. As a result, they have also been viewed by analysts as better sources of cross-sectional information. However, because of their size and scope, they are seen as expensive ways of collecting data. As the size of the pie for social science funding shrinks, some feel that the value of the smaller-scale research projects foregone by funding panel data collection projects appears too great to warrant panel designs.

Keywords

Panel Study Vote Behavior Income Dynamics Panel Design Retrospective Question 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Greg J. Duncan
  • F. Thomas Juster
  • James N. Morgan

There are no affiliations available

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