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The Design and Analysis of Longitudinal Surveys: Controversies and Issues of Cost and Continuity

  • Stephen E. Fienberg
  • Judith M. Tanur
Part of the Lecture Notes in Statistics book series (LNS, volume 38)

Abstract

Longitudinal survey data can arise in many different settings, e.g., from rotating panel surveys, in cohort studies, and in the context of field experiments that involve economic and social phenomena that change over time. In all of these settings the longitudinal feature implies repeated interviews of respondents from nonstationary populations, and both panel attrition and missing data present special concerns. The issues here are ones involving both design and analysis. Among the design issues in a longitudinal survey is how to achieve a high degree of data continuity by following movers, when the cost of such continuity is high. If the sampling units of interest are groups as opposed to individuals, there is often a critical need for operational definitions of “family” and “household”, because the concepts are dynamic and change over time. Among the analysis issues addressed in the paper are (i) the use of longitudinal vs. cross-sectional methods of imputation and adjustment for missing values, and (ii) the use of weights in longitudinal analyses to adjust for unequal probabilities of selection and nonresponse.

Keywords

American Statistical Association Longitudinal Survey National Longitudinal Survey Household Location Research Triangle Institute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen E. Fienberg
  • Judith M. Tanur

There are no affiliations available

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