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Fitting Social Skills Intervention to the Target Group

  • John D. Coie

Abstract

Much of the current research interest in the application of social skills training to samples of children is tied to the assumption that this is a potentially powerful approach to preventive intervention with children who are at future risk for various forms of disorder. Many of the contributors to this volume, including the present one, share this hope. Obviously those who share such a vision believe that social maladjustment, particularly with child peers, is a significant predictor of future disorder. They further presume that failure to resolve these social adjustment problems adequately is causally related to subsequent manifestations of disorder. Although evidence related to the first of these two assumptions will be considered in the next few pages, there is little existing evidence related to the second assumption.

Keywords

Social Skill Social Adjustment Social Skill Training Social Skill Intervention Sociometric Status 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1985

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  • John D. Coie

There are no affiliations available

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