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Some Theoretical Considerations Concerning Life History Evolution

  • Conrad A. Istock
Conference paper
Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)

Abstract

During the last 10 years evolutionary biology has entered a period of expanding theoretical scope following about two decades of rather settled satisfaction with the “modern” or “neo-Darwinian” synthesis. The modern synthesis is characterized, perhaps above all else, both by the elaboration of mathematical structures to describe the genetic diversity and response to natural selection in populations and by a qualitative focus on the properties of species and the process of speciation. The mathematical models of microevolution explored prior to 1970 usually incorporate relatively simple Mendelian genetic descriptions and ecologically simple selection regimes. The focus on species in the modern synthesis brought a much clearer conception of the biological nature of species and some easily grasped, heuristic, models of allopatric and sympatric speciation.

Keywords

Life History Fitness Character Modern Synthesis Life History Pattern Life History Evolution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Conrad A. Istock
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyUniversity of RochesterRochesterUSA

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