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Derivatives of thio- and dithiocarbamic acids

  • N. N. Melnikov

Abstract

The physiological activity of derivatives of thio- and dithiocarbamic acids has been the subject of detailed investigation. As a result of systematic study it has been established that most derivatives of the thiolocarbamic acids are active herbicides that easily penetrate into plants and move through the xylem. The most effective herbicides are the S-alkyl N,N- dialkylthiocarbamates, which act selectively on annual grasses and some dicotyledons and can be used successfully in such crops as vegetables, sugar beets, beans, etc. In this series, compounds also have been found that are useful for the control of velvet grass in rice plantings. To control weeds the thiolocarbamates usually are introduced into the soil either before sowing of the seed or prior to emergence of the seedlings. In different countries five or more S-alkyl dialkylthiocarbamates are used in agriculture to some extent.

Keywords

Zinc Oxide Carbon Disulfide Zinc Sulfate Wettable Powder Nematicidal Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. N. Melnikov
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MoscowRussia

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