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Aromatic carboxylic acids and their derivatives

  • N. N. Melnikov

Abstract

The insecticidal activity of the free acids (benzoic, phenylacetic, and naphthoic), their homologs, halo and nitro derivatives, and salts with the alkali metals and ammonia is low. Esters of a number of aromatic acids have appreciable acaricidal activity. Thus, the benzyl ester of benzoic acid is powerful acaricide for some species of mites. Introduction of halogen atoms into the benzoic acid and benzyl alcohol groups increases the biological activity of the compounds. In this connection, the toxicity to the adult mites is reinforced in compounds containing chlorine in the para-position of the benzyl radical, and the toxicity to the eggs is strengthened in compounds containing chlorine in the para-position of the benzyl radical. The acaricidal activity is increased when nitro, amino, and hydroxy groups are introduced, but in the first and second cases the toxicity to mammals also is increased. The aliphatic esters of salicyclic, anthranilic, and anisic acids are moderately toxic to body lice and codling moths.

Keywords

Benzoic Acid Wettable Powder Amine Salt Aromatic Carboxylic Acid Codling Moth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. N. Melnikov
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MoscowRussia

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