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Principles of Electrooptic Modulation

  • J. T. Milek
  • M. Neuberger

Abstract

The electrooptic effect in crystals is essentially a change in the crystalline birefringence which occurs when a crystal is placed in an electric field. Application of a properly-directed electric field within the material gives rise to a perturbation of its refractive properties, characterized by two orthogonal directions, called the “fast” and “slow” axes. An optical beam, initially plane-polarized at 45° to these axes and directed normal to their plane, will split into two orthogonal components, travelling along the same path but at different velocities, determined by their respective indices of refraction (nfast and n slow ). The phase difference between these components as they leave the crystal will depend on the difference between the refractive indices nf and ns as well as on the length of the light path L through the material:
$${\rm{\Gamma = 2\pi L\Delta n/\lambda = 2\pi L}}\left( {{n_{\rm{S}}} - {n_{\rm{f}}}} \right)/{\rm{\lambda ,}}$$
where the phase retardation or optical phase shift Ńis expressed in radians, λ is the wavelength of light in vacuum and Δn is the difference between the “fast” and “slow” refractive indices.

Keywords

Uniaxial Crystal Polarization Constant Electrooptic Coefficient Electrooptic Effect Elastic Resonance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© IFI/Plenum Data Corporation 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. T. Milek
    • 1
  • M. Neuberger
    • 1
  1. 1.Electronic Properties Information CenterHughes Aircraft CompanyCulver CityUSA

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