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Physiologic Studies Using Antibodies to Steroids

  • Burton V. Caldwell
  • Rex J. Scaramuzzi
  • Stephen A. Tillson
  • Ian H. Thorneycroft

Abstract

Following the comprehensive presentation of Dr. Lieberman et al. in 1959 on the “Chemical, Immunological, and Endocrinological Properties of Steroid-Protein Conjugates,” several investigators have described studies utilizing the ability of steroids, when coupled to a carrier protein, to act as haptens and elicit the formation of specific antibodies in properly immunized animals. The previous papers in this symposium have dealt with the chemical and immunologic aspects of steroid-protein conjugates and the reader is referred to these publications for a detailed review of the pertinent literature (Goodfriend and Sehon, 1970; Gross, 1970; Thorneycroft et al., 1970; Pressman and Grossberg, 1970). The primary emphasis of this paper will be on the endocrinologic aspects and the possible use of active and passive immunization procedures in physiologic studies. In particular, evidence will be presented which will more clearly establish the role of estradiol in the control of luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion from the pituitary gland.

Keywords

Luteinizing Hormone Estrous Cycle Passive Immunization Luteinizing Hormone Level Immunologic Method 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1970

Authors and Affiliations

  • Burton V. Caldwell
    • 1
  • Rex J. Scaramuzzi
    • 1
  • Stephen A. Tillson
    • 1
  • Ian H. Thorneycroft
    • 1
  1. 1.Worcester Foundation for Experimental BiologyShrewsburyUSA

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