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Natural history method in psychotherapy: communicational research

  • Albert E. Scheflen
Part of the The Century Psychology Series book series (TCPS)

Abstract

Since 1956 our research group at Temple University Medical Center has been studying the processes of psychotherapy. We originally attempted two approaches: (1) isolating and counting variables; and (2) clinical observation, group discussion, and formulation through consensual validation.

Keywords

Structural Unit Context Analysis General System Theory Large Picture Tural Unit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Meredith Publishing Company 1966

Authors and Affiliations

  • Albert E. Scheflen

There are no affiliations available

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