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Abstract

There are numerous macromolecules that one might refer to behavior. The ones that have been of chief concern to many investigators are the nucleic acids and proteins. Lipids have received lesser emphasis. This volume will be concerned with four types of macromolecules: deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA), proteins, and lipids; however, chief emphasis will be on the first three.

Keywords

Nerve Cell Linear Sequence External Stimulation Instructive Model Selective Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Meredith Corporation 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Gaito
    • 1
  1. 1.York UniversityTorontoCanada

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