Cocaine pp 135-147 | Cite as

Inpatient Treatment and Relapse Prevention

  • Mark S. Gold
Part of the Drugs of Abuse book series (DOAC, volume 3)


Forty years ago there was only one drug addiction treatment center in the United States. By the late 1980s, there were approximately 9000 treatment programs serving nearly 600,000 addicts at any given time.1 The recent decrease in overall drug use, coupled with our recent economic troubles, has significantly slowed the growth of treatment programs—nevertheless, specialized inpatient or outpatient treatment programs are still widely available.


Inpatient Treatment Relapse Prevention Cocaine Abuse Cocaine Treatment Outpatient Treatment Program 


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    Washton A, Gold MS. Cocaine Treatment: A Guide. American Council for Drug Education. Rockville, Md., 1986.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark S. Gold
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Neuroscience and PsychiatryUniversity of Florida College of MedicineGainesvilleUSA

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