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The YPT-Branch of the ras Superfamily of GTP-Binding Proteins in Yeast: Functional Importance of the Putative Effector Region

  • D. Gallwitz
  • J. Becker
  • M. Benli
  • L. Hengst
  • C. Mosrin-Huaman
  • M. Mundt
  • T. J. Tan
  • P. Vollmer
  • H. Wichmann
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 220)

Abstract

Both in unicellular and multicellular organisms, a large number of structurally related small GTP-binding proteins, collectively known as ras superfamily of proteins, has been identified within the past few years. These proteins are similar in size and they share highly conserved sequence motifs which, in the case of H-ras p21, have been demonstrated to be contact regions for the bound nucleotide (see 1,2 for review). It is thought, and in very few cases it is known, that the diverse members of this superfamily of proteins are regulators of basic cellular processes, including the transmission of proliferation signals, the vectorial transport and the fusion of vesicles, the proper functioning of the cytoskeleton and cell differentiation (see 1–3 for review).

Keywords

GTPase Activity Effector Region Conserve Sequence Motif Nona None Basic Cellular Process 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Gallwitz
    • 1
  • J. Becker
    • 1
  • M. Benli
    • 1
  • L. Hengst
    • 1
  • C. Mosrin-Huaman
    • 1
  • M. Mundt
    • 1
  • T. J. Tan
    • 1
  • P. Vollmer
    • 1
  • H. Wichmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Molecular GeneticsMax-Planck-Institute for Biophysical ChemistryGöttingenGermany

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