Progressive Factors in Oncogene Transfected Rodent Embryo Fibroblasts

  • Heather Marshall
  • Przemyslaw Popowicz
  • Georg Engel
  • Catharina Svensson
  • Göran Akusjärvi
  • Stig Linder
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 220)

Abstract

Activated ras oncogenes are inefficient in the transformation of primary rodent embryo fibroblasts (REFs). However, in unison with viral or cellular genes such as the adenovirus E1A, polyoma large-T, mutant p53 or myc genes, transformation will occur. No common biochemical activity has been described for these cooperating oncogenes. We and others have demonstrated that treatment of T24-ras oncogene transfected REF cells with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (DEX) facilitates transformation (Martens et al., 1988; Yamashita et al., 1988; Marshall et al., Exp. Cell. Res, in press;). During a critical period between 1–3 months after transfection, cellular growth was found to be dependent on glucocorticoid. Hormone independence invariably develops during subsequent culture. These observations raise the possibility of hormonal promotion and progression of rat embryo fibroblasts expressing activated ras genes, and may offer a convenient model for studies of promotion and progression in vitro.

Keywords

Agar Adenoma Lysin Dexamethasone Glucocorticoid 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heather Marshall
    • 1
  • Przemyslaw Popowicz
    • 1
  • Georg Engel
    • 1
  • Catharina Svensson
    • 2
  • Göran Akusjärvi
    • 2
  • Stig Linder
    • 1
  1. 1.Division for Experimental Oncology, RadiumhemmetKarolinska HospitalStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Department of Microbial GeneticsKarolinska InstituteStockholmSweden

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