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Role of Phosphatidylinositol Turnover in the Contraction of the Rat Aorta

  • Evangeline D. Motley
  • Robert R. RuffoloJr.
  • Douglas W. P. Hay
  • Andrew J. Nichols
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 308)

Abstract

The contraction of vascular smooth muscle in the rat aorta has been shown to be mediated exclusively by αl-adrenoceptors located on the cell membrane. These αl-adrenoceptors mediate vasoconstriction by stimulating both the influx of extracellular calcium through membrane calcium channels and the release of intracellular calcium stores (1,2). Recently, it has been hypothesized that full αl-adrenoceptor agonists can activate αl-adrenoceptors and stimulate both the influx of extracellular calcium and the release of intracellular calcium, whereas, partial αl-adrenoceptor agonists may only cause the influx of extracellular calcium (1,3).

Keywords

Contractile Response Extracellular Calcium Physiological Salt Solution Intracellular Calcium Store Receptor Reserve 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Evangeline D. Motley
    • 1
    • 2
  • Robert R. RuffoloJr.
    • 1
    • 2
  • Douglas W. P. Hay
    • 1
    • 2
  • Andrew J. Nichols
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologySmithKline Beecham PharmaceuticalsKing of PrussiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Physiology and BiophysicsHoward University College of MedicineUSA

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