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Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: Dissociation of Structural and Functional Effects by Therapy

  • Edward D. Frohlich
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 308)

Abstract

The heart is one of the major target organs that becomes secondarily involved with the unrelenting and progressive disease of essential hypertension (1,2). As a result of this increasing afterload that is imposed upon the left ventricle, the ventricular chamber adapts structurally as well as functionally. The functional changes involve the enhanced requirements of the ventricle that permits the chamber to overcome the pressure, and possibly also, the volume overload that is associated with the disease (3–6). The structural changes involve an increase in muscle mass that is achieved through the process of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in a manner that may be similar to the arteriolar changes demonstrated by an increased wall-to-lumen ratio that is produced by the increased thickening of the wall (5–7).

Keywords

Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Calcium Antagonist Left Ventricular Mass Total Peripheral Resistance Cardiac Mass 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward D. Frohlich
    • 1
  1. 1.Alton Ochsner Medical FoundationNew OrleansUSA

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