Effect of Growth Conditions on the Extracellular Production of the Aspartic Proteinase by Candida Albicans

  • M. Lam
  • V. Peterkin
  • E. Reiss
  • C. J. Morrison
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 306)

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that the aspartic proteinase (AP) of C. albicans (CA) is a pathogenic factor.1–3 It is one of few fungal proteins known to be transported through the cell wall and, as a major antigenic protein of CA, allows for its use in the development of immunodiagnostic tests.4 In order to facilitate this goal, increased production of AP is needed. Controversy exists as to which protein substrate allows for maximum AP production in vitro. Previous studies have used one strain of CA, one time point during AP production, and one cultivation temperature.5,6 We compared the effect of temperature, substrate and strain on the kinetics of AP production in vitro over a 14 day period.

Keywords

Albumin Agar Citrate Syringe Cavitation 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Lam
    • 1
  • V. Peterkin
    • 1
  • E. Reiss
    • 1
  • C. J. Morrison
    • 1
  1. 1.Centers for Disease ControlAtlantaUSA

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