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Calcium-Dependent and Independent Mechanisms of Contraction in Canine Lingual Artery to U-46619

  • Stan S. Greenberg
  • Ye Wang
  • Jianming Xie
  • Freidrich P. J. Diecke
  • Fred A. Curro
  • Lisa Smartz
  • Louis Rammazzatto
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 304)

Abstract

The thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 (TXA2/PGH2) mimetic, U-46619, is a potent platelet aggregating agent and constrictor of vascular smooth muscle. Aggregation and contraction to U-46619, and other TXA2/PGH2 mimetics, such as U-44069 and carbocyclic TXA2, are associated with both an influx of extracellular Ca2+ and a release of Ca2+ from binding and sequestration sites within the platelet and arterial smooth muscle (Greenberg, 1981; Loutzenhiser and van Breemen, 1981; Dorn et al., 1987; Santoian et al., 1987). These mechanisms were shown by the ability of both calcium channel blocking agents and intracellular calcium antagonists, such as dantrolene sodium and TMB-8, to inhibit contraction of vascular smooth muscle to TXA2/PGH2 receptor mimetics and by the ability of these mimetics to increase 45Ca efflux without affecting 45Ca uptake (Ally et al., 1978; Greenberg, 1981; Loutzenhiser and Van Breemen, 1981; Angerio et al., 1982; Dorn et al., 1987; Santoian et al., 1987). The pool of Ca2+ utilized for the physiologic and pharmacologic actions of U-46619 appears to depend on the site and species from which the arteries and platelets are obtained (Greenberg, 1981; Loutzenhiser and Van Breemen, 1981; Angerio et al., 1982; Dorn et al, 1987; Santoian et al., 1987; Verheyen et al., 1989).

Keywords

Mesenteric Artery Sustained Contraction Physiological Salt Solution Lingual Artery Dantrolene Sodium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stan S. Greenberg
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ye Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jianming Xie
    • 1
    • 2
  • Freidrich P. J. Diecke
    • 1
    • 2
  • Fred A. Curro
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lisa Smartz
    • 1
    • 2
  • Louis Rammazzatto
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyUMDNJ-New Jersey Medical SchoolNewarkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Dental ResearchSt. Josephs HospitalPatersonUSA

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