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HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody and Approaches to the Envelope Diversity Problem

  • Thomas J. Matthews
  • Alphonse J. Langlois
  • Stephano Butto
  • Dani Bolognesi
  • Kashi Javaherian
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 303)

Abstract

Since the discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the causative agent of AIDS in 1983–84, there has been considerable effort to design an efficacious vaccine. Principally for safety reasons, defined subunit polypeptides and proteins devoid of genomic material have been considered as alternatives to attenuated and/or killed virus. Much of the effort to develope such a component vaccine against HIV has been directed at the envelope gene products. These have included recombinant gp l60 (1,2,3), recombinant gp 120 (4,5,6), native viral gp 120 (7,8,9), bacterially expressed envelope fragments (10), and a large number of synthetic peptides (11–19). In these early studies each of the various reagents were tested for their ability to raise neutralizing antibodies in experimental animals. When successful, resultant sera were usually found to be active only against homologous virus, i.e. were isolate restricted. The results suggested that variable sites on the envelope represented the major target of neutralizing antibody raised by the various experimental immunogens.

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Cross Reactive Epitope Full Length Gp160 Divergent Isolate Principal Neutralize Determinant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas J. Matthews
    • 1
  • Alphonse J. Langlois
    • 1
  • Stephano Butto
    • 1
  • Dani Bolognesi
    • 1
  • Kashi Javaherian
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  2. 2.Repligen CorporationCambridgeUSA

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