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Immunogenicity of Lipopolysaccharide Derived from Brucella abortus: Potential as a Carrier in Development of Vaccines for AIDS

  • J. Goldstein
  • D. Hernandez
  • C. Frasch
  • P. R. Beining
  • M. Betts
  • T. Hoffman
  • B. Golding
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 303)

Abstract

In view of its unique ability to stimulate human B cells, we have considered using Brucella abortus (BA) as a carrier for human vaccines. Recently we showed that HIV-1 coupled to BA, but not unconjugated HIV-1, was able to stimulate murine responses even in the relative absence of CD4+ T cells. This result suggested that HIV-BA may be useful in boosting the immunity of individuals infected with HIV-1 and who have impaired CD4+ T cell function. In order to refine this carrier we purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from BA and examined its effects on immune responses. Similar to LPS from E. coli (LPS-EC), LPS-BA was capable of stimulating mouse B cells to proliferate. In addition, LPS-BA could activate mouse spleen cells to secrete antibodies in vitro. Isotype analysis revealed that IgM and all the IgG subclasses were elicited. When comparing these responses to those of LPS-EC, LPS-BA induced a greater percentage of IgG2a and LPS-EC evoked more IgG3. IgG2a is probably important in protection against murine viral infection. LPS-BA was haptenated with trinitrophenol TNP-LPS (BA) and tested for carrier effect. Similar to TNP-BA and TNP-LPS (EC), TNP-LPS (BA) triggered anti-TNP antibody of the IgM and all IgG subclasses. In contrast, TNP-ficoll induced mainly IgM and only small amounts of IgG3. These results suggest that LPS-BA, like intact BA, behaves as a T-independent type 1 carrier, and as such may be advantageous as a carrier for human vaccines development

Keywords

Sugar Molecule Brucella Abortus Mouse Spleen Cell Human Vaccine Core Oligosaccharide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Goldstein
    • 2
  • D. Hernandez
    • 2
  • C. Frasch
    • 1
  • P. R. Beining
    • 2
  • M. Betts
    • 2
  • T. Hoffman
    • 2
  • B. Golding
    • 2
  1. 1.Divisions of Bacterial ProductsCenter for Biologics Evaluation and Research, USFDABethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Divisions of HematologyCenter for Biologics Evaluation and Research, USFDABethesdaUSA

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