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Tumor Heterogeneity and Intrinsically Chemoresistant Subpopulations in Freshly Resected Human Malignant Gliomas

  • Joan R. Shapiro
  • Bipin M. Mehta
  • Salah A. D. Ebrahim
  • Adrienne C. Scheck
  • Paul L. Moots
  • Martin R. Fiola
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 57)

Abstract

Malignant gliomas continue to defy clinical treatment despite aggressive therapy that includes a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In the last 5 years, our success rate has not improved from 50% mortality within six months and 90% mortality within 1 1/2 years1. Furthermore, the design of new treatment strategies has been limited by our lack of understanding of the fundamental processes which occur in this tumor. Therefore, if new drugs are to be developed and rational therapeutic approaches devised we must understand the complex biology of human malignant gliomas that contribute to cellular resistance.

Keywords

Chromosome Number Human Glioma Anaplastic Astrocytoma Marker Chromosome Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Gene 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joan R. Shapiro
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bipin M. Mehta
    • 1
    • 2
  • Salah A. D. Ebrahim
    • 1
    • 2
  • Adrienne C. Scheck
    • 1
    • 2
  • Paul L. Moots
    • 1
    • 2
  • Martin R. Fiola
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.George C. Cotzias Laboratory of Neuro-Oncology and Department of NeurologyMemorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of NeurologyCornell University Medical College [J.R.S.]New YorkUSA

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