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On the Trail of the Photoreceptor for Phototropism in Higher Plants

  • Timothy W. Short
  • Markus Porst
  • Winslow R. Briggs
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 211)

Abstract

Much of the photomorphogenesis of multicellular green plants is mediated by red, far red-reversible pigment phytochrome (Hendricks and Van der Woude, 1983) By contrast, only a few selected microorganisms respond to red light signals. However, both plants and microorganisms exhibit a wide range of responses to blue and ultraviolet light (Gressel and Rau, 1983; Senger, 1987), almost certainly mediated several different blue light photoreceptors (Briggs and lino, 1983; Gressel and Rau 1983; Iino, 1988; Palit et al, 1989). A class of photoreceptors showing action spectra that one would expect for flavoproteins are found both in higher plants and fungi (Briggs and Iino, 1983). This class is frequently given the general name “cryptochrome” We are presently working with a higher plant photoreceptor that we suspect to be in this class. We will describe our current studies on this pigment system here in the hopes that at least some of what we have found may be helpful in elucidating responses blue light in microorganisms.

Keywords

Dark Control Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant Crude Membrane Fraction Blue Light Photoreceptor Purify Plasma Membrane 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Timothy W. Short
    • 1
  • Markus Porst
    • 1
  • Winslow R. Briggs
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant BiologyCarnegie Institution of WashingtonStanfordUSA

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