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Expression of Type 1 Fimbriae by E.coli F18 in the Streptomycin-Treated Mouse Large Intestine

  • K. A. Krogfelt
  • B. A. McCormick
  • R. L. Burgoff
  • D. C. Laux
  • P. S. Cohen
Part of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies Symposium Series book series (FEMS, volume 58)

Summary

E. coli F18, isolated from the feces of a healthy human, is an excellent colonizer of the streptomycin-treated mouse large intestine. Adhesion of E. coli F18 to specific receptors present in cecal and colonic mucus was inhibited by D-mannose, suggesting that the E. coli F18 Type 1 fimbriae may mediate adhesion to intestinal mucosal components. Recently, we reported that E. coli F18 and E. coli F18 FimA, an isogenic strain unable to produce Type 1 fimbriae, colonized the streptomycin treated mouse large intestine, when fed to mice simultaneously. This result suggests that Type 1 fimbriae may not be expressed invivo. In the present study, we show that E. coli F18 does express Type 1 fimbriae invivo. Furthermore, our data suggest that Type 1 fimbriae may be a limiting colonization factor to a specific niche (site) in the large intestine.

Keywords

Large Intestine Brush Border Membrane Specific Niche Isogenic Strain Distinct Niche 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. A. Krogfelt
    • 1
  • B. A. McCormick
    • 2
  • R. L. Burgoff
    • 2
  • D. C. Laux
    • 2
  • P. S. Cohen
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of MicrobiologyTechnical University of DenmarkLyngbyDenmark
  2. 2.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of Rhode IslandKingstonUSA

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