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Interactions of Yersinia with Collagen

  • Zsuzsa Kienle
  • Levente Emödy
  • Torkel Wadström
  • Paul O’Toole
Part of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies Symposium Series book series (FEMS, volume 58)

Abstract

Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica are intestinal pathogens which cause yersiniosis. Y. pestis is the causative organism of bubonic plague. Despite its association with Y. enterocolitica based on the clinical picture, Y. pseudotuberculosis is actually almost identical at the DNA level to Y. pestis. All three Yersinia species pathogenic for man are able to bind to and invade cultured eukaryotic cells. This property is conferred by the inv and ail loci (3). Complications involving connective tissue are relatively frequent sequelae following infection by a number of micro-organisms including Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, Chlamydiatrachomatis and Yersinia sp.(2). In the case of yersiniosis caused by Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica, ankylosing spondylitis, erythema nodosum and reactive arthritis are included in this category. There is an association with the HLA B27 antigen, which is relatively common in Scandinavia. Because of the known interactions of Yersinia with eukaryotic cells, and the possible significance of potential tropisms for extracellular matrix proteins, we initiated the present study of Yersinia binding to various collagen types.

Keywords

Collagen Type Reactive Arthritis Yersinia Enterocolitica Erythema Nodosum Collagen Binding 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zsuzsa Kienle
    • 1
    • 2
  • Levente Emödy
    • 1
    • 2
  • Torkel Wadström
    • 1
    • 2
  • Paul O’Toole
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Medical MicrobiologyUniversity of LundLundSweden
  2. 2.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity Medical SchoolPecsHungary

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