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Maternal Thyroid Hormones during Pregnancy: Effects on the Fetus in Congenital Hypothyroidism and in Iodine Deficiency

  • Gabriella Morreale de Escobar
  • María Jesus Obregón
  • Rosa Calvo
  • Francisco Escobar del Rey
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 299)

Abstract

For years it has been generally accepted that the mammalian placenta is virtually impermeable to the natural iodothyronines, thyroxine (T4) and 3,5,3’ triiodothyronine (T3). Although some placental transfer might occur, it would be physiologically irrelevant, with the pituitary-thyroid system being already functional and autonomous before birth 1–3. In most babies with congenital hypothyroidism, prompt onset of treatment with thyroid hormones soon after birth prevents most manifestations of brain damage. From this observation, and the idea that no thyroid hormone had been available to the fetus with an impaired thyroid, the conclusion has been drawn that thyroid hormones are not necessary for normal human brain development until birth 3, 4.

Keywords

Thyroid Hormone Iodine Deficiency Fetal Brain Congenital Hypothyroidism Fetal Plasma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gabriella Morreale de Escobar
    • 1
  • María Jesus Obregón
    • 1
  • Rosa Calvo
    • 1
  • Francisco Escobar del Rey
    • 1
  1. 1.Unidad de Endocrinologia Molecular, Instituto de Investigaciones BiomédicasConsejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas y Facultad de Medicina UAMMadridSpain

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