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Local Heteroepitaxial Diamond Growth on (100) Silicon

  • David G. K. Jeng
  • H. S. Tuan
  • James E. Butler
  • Robert F. Salat
  • Glenn J. Fricano
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 266)

Abstract

Diamond film has been successfully grown on various substrates in its metastable state (low pressure and low temperature) via the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process1. However, successful epitaxial diamond growth was limited only on diamond substrate (homoepitaxy), which are very costly. The advent of CVD diamond has stimulated great interests in various applications primarily due to the unique combination of electronic, mechanical and optical properties of diamond. Unfortunately, the grain boundaries existing in polycrystalline type diamond film will limit the performancesin electronic devices as well as in optical components2. To overcome this disadvantage, several researchers have attempted for growing textured or oriented diamond on foreign substrates, and each effort has resulted in various degree of success3,4,5. The maturity in silicon technology and the near defect-free quality of silicon material available, together with its carbide (SiC) forming property has made silicon the choice as the substrate material for diamond film growth6. However, as high as 50% lattice mismatch between.Silicon and diamond has lowered the hope of diamond/silicon heteroepitaxy7. In this paper, we are presenting the phenomena of local heteroepitaxial diamond grown on silicon (100) substrates. The in situ pretreatment of the substrate surface prior to the diamond growth, has resulted in an off axis growth of high purity local epitaxial diamond pyramids over various parts of the substrate surface.

Keywords

Diamond Film Diamond Crystal Diamond Powder Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamond Diamond Growth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • David G. K. Jeng
    • 1
  • H. S. Tuan
    • 1
  • James E. Butler
    • 1
  • Robert F. Salat
    • 1
  • Glenn J. Fricano
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Electrical EngineeringState University of New YorkStony BrookUSA

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