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The Structure of a-C:H Thin Films

  • P. J. R. Honeybone
  • R. J. Newport
  • W. S. Howells
  • J. Franks
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 266)

Abstract

The structure of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H), prepared under certain conditions, is such that it is harder, denser and more resistant to chemical attack than any other solid hydrocarbon. This, coupled with its high infra-red transparency and the ability to control the as-deposited properties to suit specific requirements, has led to many applications [1].

Keywords

Hydrogen Environment Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Total Structure Factor Continuous Random Network Intermediate Range Order 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. J. R. Honeybone
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. J. Newport
    • 1
    • 2
  • W. S. Howells
    • 3
  • J. Franks
    • 4
  1. 1.Physics LaboratoryThe University of CanterburyCaonterbury, KentUK
  2. 2.Physics LaboratoryThe University of CanterburyKentUK
  3. 3.Neutron Scince DivisionRutherford Appelton LaboratoryChilton, Didcot, OxonUK
  4. 4.Ion Tech Ltd.Teddington, Middx.UK

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