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Electron Stimulated Desorption and other Methods for the Study of Surface Phenomena Related to Atomic Level Aspects of Heterogeneous Catalysis

  • John T. YatesJr.
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 265)

Abstract

The three lectures to be presented at this workshop illustrate the use of modern physical methods of research for understanding the details of the molecular behavior of chemisorbed species on transition metal surfaces. The use of electron stimulated desorption as an investigative tool for the study of small molecules adsorbed on single crystal surfaces will be emphasized in the first two lectures. In the third lecture both infrared spectroscopy and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy will be employed to study the behavior and modification of model supported catalyst systems.

Keywords

Step Edge Single Crystal Surface Vibrational Amplitude Step Site Electron Stimulate Desorption 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • John T. YatesJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Surface Science Center, Department of ChemistryUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

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