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Evaluation Process for the Selection of Bioremediation Technologies for Exxon Valdez Oil Spill

  • Edgar Berkey
  • Jessica M. Cogen
  • Val J. Kelmeckis
  • Lawrence T. McGeehan
  • A. Thomas Merski
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 41)

Abstract

On March 24, 1989, approximately 11 million gallons of Prudhoe Bay crude oil were spilled into Prince William Sound, Alaska, as a result of the grounding of the Exxon Valdez tanker. The Prince William Sound area is a harsh and diverse environment with poor accessibility. According to the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, the shoreline is geologically young, composed largely of metamorphic rock, and ranges from vertical cliffs to boulder and pebble beaches. High-energy beaches are common and tides in these areas vary from +4 to −1 meters. In some areas, glacial and snow melt introduce large amounts of fresh water to the nearshore water of the Sound. Prince William Sound has a large population of seals and sea otters, extensive herring spawning areas, and significant numbers of sea and shorebirds. In addition, the area supports a substantial population of migratory birds that feed at beaches and inter-tidal areas.

Keywords

Vertical Cliff Daily Announcement Land Disposal Restriction Innovative Environmental Technology Normal Aliphatic Hydrocarbon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edgar Berkey
    • 1
  • Jessica M. Cogen
    • 1
  • Val J. Kelmeckis
    • 1
  • Lawrence T. McGeehan
    • 1
  • A. Thomas Merski
    • 1
  1. 1.National Environmental Technology Applications CorporationUniversity of Pittsburgh Applied Research CenterPittsburghUSA

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