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Use of Treatability Studies in Developing Remediation Strategies for Contaminated Soils

  • Michael J. McFarland
  • Ronald C. Sims
  • James W. Blackburn
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 41)

Abstract

Treatability studies are laboratory or field tests designed to provide critical data needed to evaluate and, ultimately, implement one or more treatment technologies. Remediation of contaminated soils is generally accomplished by using one of the following three types of treatments systems:
  1. 1.

    In Situ

     
  2. 2.

    Prepared Bed

     
  3. 3.

    Bioreactor (e.g., slurry reactor, compost unit)

     

Keywords

Hazardous Waste Unsaturated Zone Mass Balance Approach Chemical Mass Balance Land Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael J. McFarland
    • 1
  • Ronald C. Sims
    • 1
  • James W. Blackburn
    • 2
  1. 1.Utah Water Research LaboratoryUtah State UniversityLoganUSA
  2. 2.Energy, Environment and Resource CenterUniversity of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA

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