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Practices, Potential, and Pitfalls in the Application of Biotechnology to Environmental Problems

  • Carol D. Litchfield
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 41)

Abstract

The application of biotechnology to environmental problems is not a new concept. Although not generally recognized as examples of biotechnology, waste treatment plants (WTP) and composting certainly fit the definition of using biology and technology together. WTP’s have been the subject of much study by engineers who have developed numerous designs for dealing not only with domestic waste but with industrial wastes too. In fact, the DuPont Company has a commercial enterprise that treats thirty-five million gallons of hazardous waste per day from throughout the United States! Perhaps this type of process has not been recognized as an example of biotechnology because of the complexity and only partial microbiological understanding of WTP’s. However, the information gained from these plants is being directly applied to treating many of the environmental problems of today, and these systems should be considered as prototypes for today’s applications of biotechnology to environmental problems.

Keywords

Diatomaceous Earth Sequencing Batch Reactor Methyl Ethyl Ketone American Petroleum Institute Oily Sludge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carol D. Litchfield
    • 1
  1. 1.Environment America, Inc.NewarkUSA

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