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Bioremediation of Explosives Contaminated Soils (Scientific Questions/Engineering Realities)

  • Craig A. Myler
  • Wayne Sisk
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 41)

Abstract

The organic compounds trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexahydro4,3,5-trinitro-l,3,5-triazine (RDX) and l,3,5,7-tetranitro-l,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) have all been demonstrated as subject to biological attack to some degree. In fact, RDX and HMX are routinely treated in wastewaters from production facilities by a conventional anaerobic biological process. The presence of the subject compounds in soil, however, has proven a more difficult removal problem for biological processes, especially in the case of TNT, for which biological treatment was not considered possible before 1975. This paper will discuss the origins of soil contamination by explosives and the current efforts to reduce the treatment costs of these soils using biological methods.

Keywords

Biological Treatment Slurry Reactor Compost Pile Compost Period Explosive Compound 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Craig A. Myler
    • 1
  • Wayne Sisk
    • 1
  1. 1.U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials AgencyAberdeen Proving GroundUSA

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