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Effects of L-Tryptophan on the Brainstem Indole and Catecholamine Metabolites in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

  • D. Ghosh
  • B. O. Anyanwu
  • J. Guilford
  • L. L. Henderson
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 294)

Abstract

L-Tryptophan has several beneficial effect in mammals including humans. The amino acid is known to alleviate insomnia (Hartman and Greenwald, 1984), and it does act as a natural tranquilizer as well as an analgesic (Lytle et al., 1975; Hosobuchi et al., 1980a,b). Two recent reports (Sved et al., 1982; Wolf and Kuhn, 1984) and our current laboratory observations (this paper) indicate that L-tryptophan elicits pronounced antihypertensive effects in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) were utilized as normotensive counterparts of SHRs in our experiments.

Keywords

Biogenic Amine Catecholamine Metabolite Tryptophan Loading Regular Blood Pressure Control Brainstem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Ghosh
    • 1
  • B. O. Anyanwu
    • 1
  • J. Guilford
    • 2
  • L. L. Henderson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyTexas Southern UniversityUSA
  2. 2.College of PharmacyHoustonUSA

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