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Endocrine Response of Prolactin, Cortisol, and Growth Hormone to Low Dose Intravenous L-Tryptophan in Healthy Subjects During Day and Night

  • G. Hajak
  • A. Rodenbeck
  • J. Blanke
  • W. Wuttke
  • E. Rüther
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 294)

Abstract

Neuroendocrine responses to intravenous (i.v.) administered L-trypto-phan (LTP) seem to be an index of brain serotonin (5-HT) function (Meites and Sonntag, 1981; Meltzer et al., 1982; Cowen, 1987, 1988). 5-HT seriously affects the regulation of the sleep wake cycle (Jouvet, 1984). Pituitary gland hormones such as growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and cortisol, show nycthemeral rhythmicity. Sleep as a part of a circadian rhythm has a masking effect on these hormones: maximal on GH, but minimal on cortisol (Parker et al., 1980; Clarenbach and Ries, 1985).

Keywords

Growth Hormone Sleep Wake Cycle Brain Serotonin Neuroendocrine Response Amino Acid Availability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Hajak
    • 2
  • A. Rodenbeck
    • 2
  • J. Blanke
    • 2
  • W. Wuttke
    • 1
  • E. Rüther
    • 2
  1. 1.Clin. and Exp. EndocrinologyUniversity of GöttingenGermany
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of GöttingenGermany

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