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Circadian Patterns of Salivary Melatonin and Urinary 6-Sulfatoxy-Melatonin before and after A 9 Hour Time-Shift

  • T. Nickelsen
  • A. Samel
  • H. Maass
  • M. Vejvoda
  • H. Wegmann
  • K. Schöffling
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 294)

Abstract

During the past decade, many laboratories have replaced melatonin (MT) determination in serum by the measurement of the hormone in saliva, or its main metabolite 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (MTS) in urine. Advantages of these methods include non-invasive sampling techniques which have proven extremely beneficial during longitudinal studies in humans; in addition, determination of urinary MTS excretion allows to calculate more closely the total amount of MT production. Several groups have reported high correlations between serum and salivary MT on the one hand (Vakkuri 1985; Miles et al., 1987; Nowak et al., 1987), and between serum MT and urinary MTS on the other (Markey et al., 1985; Bojkowski et al., 1987). However, all these studies were done under baseline conditions, i.e. with subjects living in a regular 24 h-time pattern.

Keywords

Time Shift Circadian Pattern Aerospace Medicine Partial Sleep Deprivation Plasma Melatonin Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Nickelsen
    • 2
  • A. Samel
    • 1
  • H. Maass
    • 1
  • M. Vejvoda
    • 1
  • H. Wegmann
    • 1
  • K. Schöffling
    • 2
  1. 1.DFLVLR Institute of Aerospace MedicineKölnGermany
  2. 2.Department of EndocrinologyUniversity HospitalFrankfurt/MainGermany

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