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Alcoholism pp 211-216 | Cite as

Effects of Ethanol on the Rat Medial Septum Nucleus: An in Vivo Study

  • P. Verbanck
  • J. Scuvée
  • I. Giesbers
  • C. Kornreich
  • A. Dresse
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 206)

Abstract

Among basal forebrain structures, the medial septum and diagonal band complex (MSDB) is interesting because it provides the major source of extrinsic cholinergic fibers to the hippocampus (Lewis and Shute, 1967; Mellgren and Srebo, 1973; Amaral and Kurz, 1985). Physiological and pharmacological studies have provided evidence that this septohippocampal projection plays a major role in the rhythmic slow activity (theta rhythm) of the hippocampal formation (Bland, 1986). Furthermore, cholinergic septal neurons seem to be necessary for the achievement of learning tasks by the hippocampus (Ikegami et al., 1989).

Keywords

Hippocampal Formation Theta Rhythm Medial Septum Lateral Septum Acute Ethanol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Verbanck
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. Scuvée
    • 1
    • 2
  • I. Giesbers
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. Kornreich
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Dresse
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Psychologie Médicale — Unité de Recherche sur la Biologie des DépendancesUniversité Libre de BruxellesBrusselsBelgium
  2. 2.Laboratoire de PharmacologieUniversité LiègeBelgium

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