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Antiviral Evaluation of HIV-1 Specific Ribozyme Expressed in CD4+ HeLa Cells

  • John A. Zaia
  • Edouard M. Cantin
  • Pairoj S. Chang
  • Nava Sarver
  • John J. Rossi
Part of the GWUMC Department of Biochemistry Annual Spring Symposia book series (GWUN)

Abstract

Catalytic RNA, called ribozyme, has been shown to enzymatically cleave specific sites in RNA (for reviews, see Cech and Bass, 1986, and Uhlmann and Peymen, 1990). One group of ribozymes has an active site of consensus sequences forming a “hammerhead” structure. The active center of the hammerhead ribozyme consists of 11 essential bases juxtaposed near 3 target bases (Cech, 1988). The potential versatility of this system lies in the fact that simple ribozymes can be constructed which target sites in native RNA, completing the active site in a trans configuration, and inducing cleavage (Haseloff and Gerlach, 1988). Ribozymes, which have been developed to cleave human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA, can be transcribed in both in vitro and in vivo systems (Chang et al., 1990; Sarver et al.,1990). The purpose of this report is to review the studies evaluating the effect of ribozyme on HIV-1 RNA cleavage and on the antiviral effect in mammalian cells. Using a hammerhead motif, ribozymes were constructed which targeted a gag cleavage site, were cloned into a mammalian expression vector, and used to transform HeLa-CD4+ cells. These cells expressed HIV-1-specific ribozyme and demonstrated inhibition of HIV-1 infection.

Keywords

Dulbecco Modify Eagle Medium Hammerhead Ribozyme States Public Health Service Grant Ribozyme Expression Synthetic Ribozyme 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • John A. Zaia
    • 1
  • Edouard M. Cantin
    • 1
  • Pairoj S. Chang
    • 2
  • Nava Sarver
    • 3
  • John J. Rossi
    • 2
  1. 1.City of Hope National Medical CenterDuarteUSA
  2. 2.Beckman Research Institute of the City of HopeDuarteUSA
  3. 3.National Institute of Allergy and Infectious DiseasesBethesdaUSA

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