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Suppression of T Lymphocyte Subpopulations by THC

  • Susan Pross
  • Catherine Newton
  • Thomas Klein
  • Ray Widen
  • Judy Smith
  • Herman Friedman
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 288)

Abstract

THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol) is considered the major psychoactive component of marijuana. It is widely acknowledged that THC can depress various parameters of the immune response. These parameters include lymphocyte proliferation, macrophage spreading, and antibody production (1–3). Studies have suggested that THC has different magnitudes of effect depending on the lymphoid organ analyzed (2) as well as the age of the animal (4). Different lymphoid organs of adult mice as well as identical organs from mice of various ages have unique proportions of lymphoid cell subpopulations. This study examines the effect of THC on lymphoid cell subpopulations using the lymphoblastogenic assay (LBT) as well as analysis of cell subpopulations by the fluorescent activated cell sorter (FACS).

Keywords

Spleen Cell Fluorescent Activate Cell Sorter Lymphoid Organ Identical Organ Fluorescent Activate Cell Sorter Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan Pross
    • 1
  • Catherine Newton
    • 1
  • Thomas Klein
    • 1
  • Ray Widen
    • 1
  • Judy Smith
    • 1
  • Herman Friedman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical Microbiology and ImmunologyUniversity of South Florida College of MedicineTampaUSA

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