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The Relationship Between Primary and Secondary Metabolism in Streptomycetes

  • G. Padilla
  • Z. Hindle
  • R. Callis
  • A. Corner
  • M. Ludovice
  • P. Liras
  • S. Baumberg
Part of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies Symposium Series book series (FEMS, volume 55)

Abstract

Most of the work on control of gene expression in streptomycetes has been done up till now on pathways of secondary metabolism. Two primary metabolism systems, both catabolic, have been investigated in detail, namely those of glycerol (Smith and Chater, 1988) and galactose (Adams et al., 1988) catabolism. Biosynthetic pathways have however received less attention so far, although studies of the proline (D.A. Hodgson, personal communication) and histidine (Limauro et al., 1990) biosynthesis systems are in hand. This is perhaps surprising because of the obvious relationship of biosynthetic primary metabolism to secondary metabolism, in that the end products of the former constitute the starting materials for the latter. One potentially important aspect of this is that the availability of the primary metabolite precursors of secondary metabolism may be one factor in determining secondary metabolite yield. It might therefore be the case that where a primary metabolite is used in secondary metabolite synthesis, its own formation is subject to controls over and above those that apply when this is not so.

Keywords

Clavulanic Acid Primary Metabolite Arginine Metabolism Arginine Biosynthesis Ornithine Carbamoyl Transferase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Padilla
    • 1
  • Z. Hindle
    • 1
  • R. Callis
    • 1
  • A. Corner
    • 1
  • M. Ludovice
    • 2
  • P. Liras
    • 2
  • S. Baumberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of GeneticsUniversity of LeedsLeedsEngland
  2. 2.Dpto. de MicrobiologiaUniversidad de LeonLeonSpain

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