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The Relevance of the Death Drive to the Nuclear Age

  • Lowell J. Rubin

Abstract

As the twentieth century draws to a close we are forced to conclude, as we look around us, that we have important limitations as individuals and societies. These limitations are not just external, but involve forces within us that are hard to control. They now threaten us in a way that was not possible before.

Keywords

Original Work Sexual Drive Standard Edition Life Force Pleasure Principle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lowell J. Rubin
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.The Boston Psychoanalytic InstituteBostonUSA
  2. 2.Brown UniversityProvidenceUSA

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